Streets of Myth

A live action web-series set in an alternate-universe, contemporary England where every neighbourhood is a fiefdom and every wrong look can end in blood.

WHY READ WHEN YOU COULD WATCH? SEE OUR PROOF-OF-CONCEPT SHORT FILM HERE!

At first glance, the Birmingham in Streets of Myth looks a lot like ours. The buildings look about right. The clothes are the same. The kids listen to hip-hop and hard rock. Birmingham's neighbourhoods are roughly the same too: Aston, Digbeth, Nechells, The Jewellery Quarter & more.

But instead of a city, they are a loose collection of gangs and petty rivalries, tied together and policed by the weakened and corrupt forces of The Crown. These gangs aren't quite like our gangs though. They don't have guns.

They have swords, spears and the ancient martial traditions of the Far East. Each neighbourhood has their own power structure, their own laws and their own fighting style.

The Streets of Myth are a place that lies at the intersection of DJ's and dim-maks, kings and graffiti, B-boys and bloodied swords.

 

Post-Prod Phase 2: Sound & Music

We have moved past the "rough cut" stage and, while we're not quite at the fabled "picture lock", we're close enough to start working on sound.

Which, in my opinion, is when a movie goes from "awkward, random crap" to an actual movie. It's said often, but does need to be repeated even more often: sound is 50% of the information your audience is receiving.  In my experience, it's also the more important 50%.

 Somewhere in Leeds, there's a dude who looks just like this.

Somewhere in Leeds, there's a dude who looks just like this.

Most audiences are more than willing to overlook subpar lighting or camerawork (sorry DPs, but it's true), but if your sound is off, they are thrown right out of the movie. I don't mean you have to wow anyone with your mad sound skillz, I simply mean that the overall sound mix, and particularly transitions between scenes, need to feel natural. Much like good picture editing, that sound mix needs to mostly be invisible. A weird bit of ambient tone or an oddly mixed sound effect just murders suspension of disbelief. It's as primal as jumping at loud noises.

Thankfully, we're very lucky to have some very talented people making sure the sound and music kick as much ass as our performers. 

 

 

 Meanwhile, somewhere in Birmingham, they're recording music.

Meanwhile, somewhere in Birmingham, they're recording music.